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God never requires us to believe without evidence.

God never requires us to believe without evidence.

“But I give no credit to miracles,” says a deist. This may be an act of reason, or it may not. God never requires us to believe without evidence: but where sufficient evidence is given, he is highly and justly displeased at men’s unbelief. Miracles are capable of...

William Adams: For men to act without motives is unnatural

William Adams: For men to act without motives is unnatural

For men to act without motives is as unnatural, as it is for a body to sink without weight—to act against the force of motives is as contrary to nature, as it is for a stone to ascend against the laws of gravity. Hear what this author says himself in another Essay: “We cannot make use of a more convincing argument, than to prove, that the actions ascribed to any person are directly contrary to the course of nature, and that no human motives, in such circumstances, could ever induce him to such a conduct.”

Peter Bayne on David Hume

Peter Bayne on David Hume

There is not, to my knowledge, in the whole range of literature an evasion like that in Hume’s Essay on Miracles. I can find no word, no figure of speech, no parallel case, by which adequately to represent its enormity. If we suppose a man of the highest character put...

Richard Whately: Muddy water is apt to be supposed deeper than it is

Richard Whately: Muddy water is apt to be supposed deeper than it is

Muddy water is apt to be supposed deeper than it is, because you cannot see to the bottom; very clear water, on the contrary, will always seem less deep than it is, both from the well-known law of refraction, and also because it is so thoroughly penetrated by the sight.

If Nothing is Forbidden, Then Anything Is Possible

If Nothing is Forbidden, Then Anything Is Possible

On the one hand, the idea that mankind is only a collection of genes which make up the DNA patterns has naturally led to the concept of remaking all of humanity with the use of genetic engineering. On the other hand, it has led to the crime and cruelty that now...

Olinthus Gregory: He will boast of this single objection

Olinthus Gregory: He will boast of this single objection

To reject Christianity, therefore, on account of its difficulties, is unreasonable: because it is to reject it for possessing what its own writings declare to be essential to its nature and purpose: and to proceed by way of objections drawn from these difficulties is unfair; because it is walking in a path in which a man can never be stopped unless he please, and in which, though he travel for ever, it is impossible he can arrive at truth and certainty. Let him propose a thousand objections in succession, and suppose nine hundred and ninety-nine of them to be answered satisfactorily; still the one which he retains, and which he supposes to be unanswerable, because he has not received an answer to it, will be deemed a sufficient plea to justify his continuing incredulous. He will boast of this single objection, though probably the point to which it relates may be one which it is impossible for us to place in a proper light, unless we could see and know as God does.

The uninterrupted testimony of ages

The uninterrupted testimony of ages

We receive the books of the New Testament as the genuine works of Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Paul, James, Peter, and Jude, for the same reason that we receive the writings of Xenophon, of Polybius, of Caesar, Tacitus, and Quintus Curtius; namely, because we have the uninterrupted testimony of ages to their genuineness, and we have no reason to suspect imposition.

George Horne: Pertness and ignorance

George Horne: Pertness and ignorance

Pertness and ignorance may ask a question in three lines, which it will cost learning and ingenuity thirty pages to answer. When this is done, the same question shall be triumphantly asked again the next year, as if nothing had ever been written upon the subject.

McIlvaine, Charles Pettit

McIlvaine, Charles Pettit

Charles Pettit McIlvaine (1799-1873), Episcopal Bishop of Ohio and president of Kenyon College, explains that he composed these lectures on the occasion of being invited to give lectures on apologetics in New York. Like Paley and Chalmers, McIlvaine openly...

The Old Man and the Sea

The Old Man and the Sea

At first glance, a Victorian sailor might seem an unlikely candidate to make a contribution to the study of the New Testament. And James Smith of Jordanhill was undoubtedly a sailor. Born at Glasgow in 1782 and educated at the University of Glasgow, Smith was one of the earliest members both of the Royal Yacht Club and one of the earliest commodores of the Royal Northern Yacht Club. His first voyage in his own vessel in 1806 was the beginning of a lifelong love affair with the sea. He took his last cruise in 1866, just a year before his death.

But Smith was much more than just a sailor; he was also a keen student of ancient literature, a scholar who could read with facility not only Greek and Latin but also most of the Romance and Teutonic languages, and a collector of rare books, particularly those relating to early voyages and travels. His knowledge both of geology and of archaeology was considerable, and on the subject of ships of the ancients he was a recognized authority.

Leland, John

Leland, John

(Read volume 1 and volume 2 at the Internet Archive) John Leland (1696-1766), an English dissenting (Presbyterian) minister who settled in Dublin, well deserves Hunt’s description as “the indefatigable opponent of the whole generation of the deists.” Near the end of...

FREE SHIPPING on Westcott’s “Gospel of the Resurrection”

FREE SHIPPING on Westcott’s “Gospel of the Resurrection”

Today is the birthday of B.F. Westcott!  Celebrate with FREE SHIPPING (limited time) on Westcott’s “Gospel of the Resurrection” with introduction by Dr. Timothy McGrew! Includes translation of all of the foreign language quotations within the editorial footnotes for...

Andrews Norton: He came to teach us not by words alone

Andrews Norton: He came to teach us not by words alone

The Saviour of men came to teach us that all worldly distinctions are as nothing, compared with those which concern our spiritual nature and our immortal being;—and how could he have taught this, if he had not himself trodden them under foot?

Campbell, George

Campbell, George

George Campbell (1719-1796) was a Scottish Presbyterian theologian and professor and principal at Marischall College and a member of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society, of which the noted Scottish philosopher Thomas Reid was also a member. Campbell’s book is perhaps...